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tragedies

Page history last edited by Andrew Alder 2 years, 2 months ago Saved with comment

I guess everyone knows that the holocaust occurred

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Holocaust

 

and that six million Jews were killed out of about nine million then in Europe, and that this has had an enormous impact on world politics ever since.

 

But it's not the only such tragedy.

 

The Holodomor

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holodomor

 

was a deliberate famine that Stalin organised to stifle Ukranian nationalism. Three to ten million died, depending on who you believe (some politicians say twenty million, others say none). A similar exercise in Kazakstan at the same time killed 15% of the population there. (And I haven't yet found anyone who denies the Kazakstan famine, unlike the Ukrainian one and of course the Holocaust. But there's sure to be someone.)

 

The failed invasion of the Soviet Union by the Nazis

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Barbarossa

 

left a Soviet death toll of about 26 million, most of them civilians. Thousands of towns and villages simply ceased to exist. Many know of the Nazi atrocities in France, and particularly the Oradour-sur-Glane massacre

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oradour-sur-Glane_massacre

 

but in Russia, such events were unremarkable. 

 

There is no doubt that world history has been influenced by the Holocaust, but also by many other, often quite similar, tragedies. In the West, even on the Internet, the history we have been fed is rather selective. The Holocaust and Oradour-sur-Glane receive regular press, while these other tragedies have had less impact. But they have had enormous and understandable impact on the local politics of the areas they affected.

 

Will the Internet bring a better perspective? Or will it result in further polarisation and political misinformation? Probably a bit of both. Time will tell.     

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